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PTE Summarise Spoken Text Practice 1

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

So, my mother’s a pediatrician, and when I was young, she’d tell the craziest stories that combined science with her overactive imagination. One of the stories she told was that if you eat a lot of salt, all of the blood rushes up your legs, through your body, and shoots out the top of your head, killing you instantly. She called it “high blood pressure.”

This was my first experience with science fiction, and I loved it. So when I started to write my own science fiction and fantasy, I was surprised that it was considered un-African. So naturally, I asked, what is African? And this is what I know so far: Africa is important. Africa is the future. It is, though. And Africa is a serious place where only serious things happen.

So, when I present my work somewhere, someone will always ask, “What’s so important about it? How does it deal with real African issues like war, poverty, devastation or AIDS?” And it doesn’t. My work is about Nairobi pop bands that want to go to space or about seven-foot-tall robots that fall in love. It’s nothing incredibly important. It’s just fun, fierce and frivolous, as frivolous as bubble gum — “AfroBubbleGum.”

Notes:
• Mother paediatrician young crazy stories
• Blood shoot out the top of your head— “high blood pressure”
• Science fiction / fantasy = unAfrican
• “Africa is the future, Africa is serious.”
• “What is important about your work? War, poverty, AIDS?
• It’s not imptnt. It’s fun, fierce, frivolous.
• It’s AfroBubbleGum

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing her music and African heritage. She mentioned that her mother was a paediatrician and told her crazy stories when she was young. She talked about how she was told that Africa is the future and is serious. She described how when people ask if her work is about poverty, war or AIDS, she says it isn’t, suggesting that it is fun and frivolous like bubblegum—AfroBubbleGum.

(70 words)


PTE Summarise Spoken Text Practice 2

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

When you get to a party, do you head for people your own age? Have you ever grumbled about entitled millennials? Have you ever rejected a haircut or a relationship or an outing because it’s not age-appropriate? For adults, there’s no such thing. All these behaviours are ageist. We all do them, and we can’t challenge bias unless we’re aware of it. Nobody’s born ageist, but it starts at early childhood, around the same time attitudes towards race and gender start to form, because negative messages about late life bombard us from the media and popular culture at every turn. Right? Wrinkles are ugly. Old people are pathetic. It’s sad to be old. Look at Hollywood. A survey of recent Best Picture nominations found that only 12 percent of speaking or named characters were age 60 and up, and many of them were portrayed as impaired. Older people can be the most ageist of all, because we’ve had a lifetime to internalize these messages and we’ve never thought to challenge them. I had to acknowledge it and stop colluding. “Senior moment” quips, for example: I stopped making them when it dawned on me that when I lost the car keys in high school, I didn’t call it a “junior moment.”

Notes:

  • Discrimination based on age
  • Rejecting on the basis of age
  • No such thing for adults
  • Nobody’s born ageist
  • Media bombards us with negatives
  • Hollywood: 12% named characters 60 and up
  • Senior moment same as junior moment.

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing ageism. She talked about discrimination based on a person’s age. She mentioned rejecting a haircut or relationship because it was age inappropriate. She discussed how Hollywood has about 12% of named characters over the age of 60. She suggested that no-one is born ageist, and quipping about a senior moment didn’t explain why if she had a “junior moment” she never passed comment on it.

(69 words)


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