You can find all 7 PTE Summarise Spoken Text practice samples below. Enjoy! 

PTE Summarise Spoken Text Practice 1

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

So, my mother’s a pediatrician, and when I was young, she’d tell the craziest stories that combined science with her overactive imagination. One of the stories she told was that if you eat a lot of salt, all of the blood rushes up your legs, through your body, and shoots out the top of your head, killing you instantly. She called it “high blood pressure.”

This was my first experience with science fiction, and I loved it. So when I started to write my own science fiction and fantasy, I was surprised that it was considered un-African. So naturally, I asked, what is African? And this is what I know so far: Africa is important. Africa is the future. It is, though. And Africa is a serious place where only serious things happen.

So, when I present my work somewhere, someone will always ask, “What’s so important about it? How does it deal with real African issues like war, poverty, devastation or AIDS?” And it doesn’t. My work is about Nairobi pop bands that want to go to space or about seven-foot-tall robots that fall in love. It’s nothing incredibly important. It’s just fun, fierce and frivolous, as frivolous as bubble gum — “AfroBubbleGum.”

Notes:
• Mother paediatrician young crazy stories
• Blood shoot out the top of your head— “high blood pressure”
• Science fiction / fantasy = unAfrican
• “Africa is the future, Africa is serious.”
• “What is important about your work? War, poverty, AIDS?
• It’s not imptnt. It’s fun, fierce, frivolous.
• It’s AfroBubbleGum

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing her music and African heritage. She mentioned that her mother was a paediatrician and told her crazy stories when she was young. She talked about how she was told that Africa is the future and is serious. She described how when people ask if her work is about poverty, war or AIDS, she says it isn’t, suggesting that it is fun and frivolous like bubblegum—AfroBubbleGum.

(70 words)

PTE Summarise Spoken Text Practice 2

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

When you get to a party, do you head for people your own age? Have you ever grumbled about entitled millennials? Have you ever rejected a haircut or a relationship or an outing because it’s not age-appropriate? For adults, there’s no such thing. All these behaviours are ageist. We all do them, and we can’t challenge bias unless we’re aware of it. Nobody’s born ageist, but it starts at early childhood, around the same time attitudes towards race and gender start to form, because negative messages about late life bombard us from the media and popular culture at every turn. Right? Wrinkles are ugly. Old people are pathetic. It’s sad to be old. Look at Hollywood. A survey of recent Best Picture nominations found that only 12 percent of speaking or named characters were age 60 and up, and many of them were portrayed as impaired. Older people can be the most ageist of all, because we’ve had a lifetime to internalize these messages and we’ve never thought to challenge them. I had to acknowledge it and stop colluding. “Senior moment” quips, for example: I stopped making them when it dawned on me that when I lost the car keys in high school, I didn’t call it a “junior moment.”

Notes:

  • Discrimination based on age
  • Rejecting on the basis of age
  • No such thing for adults
  • Nobody’s born ageist
  • Media bombards us with negatives
  • Hollywood: 12% named characters 60 and up
  • Senior moment same as junior moment.

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing ageism. She talked about discrimination based on a person’s age. She mentioned rejecting a haircut or relationship because it was age inappropriate. She discussed how Hollywood has about 12% of named characters over the age of 60. She suggested that no-one is born ageist, and quipping about a senior moment didn’t explain why if she had a “junior moment” she never passed comment on it.

(69 words)

PTE Summarise Spoken Text Practice 3

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

If you ask people what the three most important things that they carry are — across cultures and across gender and across contexts — most people will say keys, money and, if they own one, a mobile phone. The question is, why?  So why are these things so important in our lives? And it turns out, from our research, that it boils down to survival — survival for us and survival for our loved ones.

So, keys provide an access to shelter and warmth — transport as well, in the U.S. increasingly. Money is useful for buying food, sustenance, among all its other uses. And a mobile phone, it turns out, is a great recovery tool. If you prefer this kind of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, those three objects are very good at supporting the lowest rungs in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. And in particular, it’s the mobile phone’s ability to allow people to transcend space and time. And what I mean by that is, you know, you can transcend space by simply making a voice call, right? And you can transcend time by sending a message at your convenience, and someone else can pick it up at their convenience. And this is fairly universally appreciated, it turns out, which is why we have three billion plus people who have been connected. And they value that connectivity.

Notes:

  • The three most important things that people carry?
  • Keys, money and if they have one a mobile phone.
  • They are important for survival.
  • Keys provide access to shelter and transport.
  • Money can be used to buy food.
  • The phone is a great recovery tool.
  • These equate with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.
  • With the mobile phone you can be connected across time and space, and three billion people use one.

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing the three most important things that people carry. He mentioned that keys, money and a mobile phone are important for survival. He talked about how these relate to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: shelter (keys), food (money) and connectivity (phone). He suggested that three billion people use a phone and we can be connected across time and space.

(61 words)

Summarize Spoken Text Practice 4

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

Let me tell you what we think about children. They’re hardwired for struggle when they get here. And when you hold those perfect little babies in your hand, our job is not to say, “Look at her, she’s perfect. My job is just to keep her perfect — make sure she makes the tennis team by fifth grade and Yale by seventh.” That’s not our job. Our job is to look and say, “You know what? You’re imperfect, and you’re wired for struggle, but you are worthy of love and belonging.” That’s our job.

Show me a generation of kids raised like that, and we’ll end the problems, I think, that we see today. I would say to companies, this is not our first rodeo, people. We just need you to be authentic and real and say … “We’re sorry. We’ll fix it.” But there’s another way. This is what I have found: To let ourselves be seen, deeply seen, vulnerably seen … to love with our whole hearts, even though there’s no guarantee — and that’s really hard, and I can tell you as a parent, that’s excruciatingly difficult — to practice gratitude and joy in those moments of terror, when we’re wondering, “Can I love you this much? Can I believe in this this passionately? Can I be this fierce about this?” just to be able to stop and, instead of catastrophizing what might happen, to say, “I’m just so grateful, because to feel this vulnerable means I’m alive.”

And the last, which I think is probably the most important, is to believe that we’re enough. Because when we work from a place, I believe, that says, “I’m enough” … then we stop screaming and start listening, we’re kinder and gentler to the people around us, and we’re kinder and gentler to ourselves.

Notes:

  • Children are hardwired for struggle
  • Our job: kids not perfect but worthy of love and belonging
  • Companies need to be authentic and real
  • This is not our first time at the rodeo
  • She found: let us love with our whole hearts, practice gratitude and joy
  • Believe that we are enough and we are kinder and gentler to the people around us and to ourselves

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing the need to be kind. She mentioned how children are hardwired to survive. She discussed how our job is to tell them that they are worthy of love and belonging. She mentioned that companies need to be authentic when they make mistakes. She suggested that if we accept we are enough, we will be kinder and more gentle to people around us and to ourselves.

(69 words)

Summarize Spoken Text Practice 5

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

I want to admit that I am an optimist. Any tough problem, I think it can be solved. And part of the reason I feel that way is looking at the past. Over the past century, average lifespan has more than doubled. Another statistic, perhaps my favourite, is to look at childhood deaths. As recently as 1960, 110 million children were born, and 20 million of those died before the age of five. Five years ago, 135 million children were born — so, more — and less than 10 million of them died before the age of five. So that’s a factor of two in the reduction of the childhood death rate.

It’s a phenomenal thing. Each one of those lives matters a lot. And the key reason we were able to do it was not only rising incomes but also a few key breakthroughs: vaccines that were used more widely. For example, measles was four million of the deaths back as recently as 1990 and now is under 400,000. So, we really can make changes. The next breakthrough is to cut that in half again. And I think that’s doable in well under 20 years. Why? Well there’s only a few diseases that account for the vast majority of those deaths: diarrhoea, pneumonia and malaria.

Notes: 

  • He is an optimist. Any tough prob can b solved.
  • Halved the infant death rate over 50 years
  • Rising incomes and vaccines have helped
  • Measles was 4 million and is now under 400 000
  • Cut in ½ again in the next 20 yrs
  • Only a few diseases account for deaths
  • Diarrhoea pneumonia and malaria (these are difficult to spell—so perhaps leave them out)

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing disease. He mentioned that he is an optimist and any tough problem can be solved. He talked about how measles accounted for 4 million of ten million infant deaths. He discussed that this could be reduced to 200,000 in the next 20 years. He suggested that only a few diseases account for most infant deaths.

(59 words)

Summarize Spoken Text Practice 6

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

For my senior collection at fashion design school, I decided to try and 3D print an entire fashion collection from my home. The problem was that I barely knew anything about 3D printing, and I had only nine months to figure out how to print five fashionable looks. I always felt most creative when I worked from home. I loved experimenting with new materials, and I always tried to develop new techniques to make the most unique textiles for my fashion projects. I loved going to old factories and weird stores in search of leftovers of strange powders and weird materials, and then bring them home to experiment on. As you can probably imagine, my roommates didn’t like that at all.

Notes: 

  • Senior collection @ fashion school: tried 3D printing
  • Knew nothing re 3D printing
  • Felt more creative working from home
  • Developed new techniques and unique textiles
  • Collected weird and strange materials and bring them home
  • My roommates didn’t like it at all

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing how for her senior collection at fashion school she tried 3D printing. She mentioned how she knew nothing about it but had to create five fashion looks. She described how she felt more creative working from home and discussed how she collected weird and strange materials to develop unique textiles. She suggested that her roommates didn’t like her bringing this work home.

66 words 

Summarise Spoken Text Practice 7

Listen to the following text, take notes of the main ideas, and write a 50 to 70 word response. You have ten minutes to complete the task.

Transcript of audio:

I’m here to talk about the next big thing, because what we’re finding out is that we have this capacity to report eyewitness accounts of what’s going on in real time. We’re seeing this in events like Mumbai recently, where it’s so much easier to report now than it is to consume it. There is so much information; what do you do? So, what we find is that there is this great deal of wasted crisis information because there is just too much information for us to actually do anything with right now.

And what we’re actually really concerned with is this first three hours. What we are looking at is the first three hours. How do we deal with that information that is coming in? You can’t understand what is actually happening. On the ground and around the world people are still curious, and trying to figure out what is going on. But they don’t know. You see this with Twitter, too. You get this information overload. So you’ve got a lot of information. That’s great. But now what?

So we think that there is something interesting we can do here. And we have a small team who is working on this. We think that we can actually create a crowdsourced filter. Take the crowd and apply them to the information. And by rating it and by rating the different people who submit information, we can get refined results and weighted results. So that we have a better understanding of the probability of something being true or not. This is the kind of innovation that is, quite frankly — it’s interesting that it’s coming from Africa. It’s coming from places that you wouldn’t expect.

Notes: 

  • Eyewitness accounts of first three hours can cause overload
  • No-one really knows what is going on
  • Too much information
  • We can create a crowdsourced filter
  • By rating the different people who submit information, get refined and weighted results.
  • Better probability of something being true or not
  • Innovation coming out of Africa.

Click Here to See our PTE 90 Sample Answer!

Summarise Spoken Text Answer:

The speaker was discussing crowdsourcing news reports of crises. He mentioned that the first three hours can be unclear and overloaded. He talked about how we can create a crowdsourced filter. He mentioned that people can rate comments to better indicate the probability of true reports. He suggested that it is amazing that this is innovation is coming out of Africa.

61 words 

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