The text boxes below have been placed in a random order. Reorder the paragraphs.

A) But his most stunning project first came to light in 1974 when farmers uncovered strange figures while digging a well near the old Chinese capital of Xianyang. Excavations have since revealed sections of a grand funerary complex. Three huge pits harbor several thousand warriors, presumably meant to protect the emperor for eternity. These statues were unlike anything ever uncovered before in China. And that raises a big question: How could the royal artists have come up with such an idea?

B) Known today as the First Emperor, Qin Shi Huang Di left a legacy that would make him a towering figure in Chinese history. By the time he died in 210 B.C., he had united warring kingdoms into one country, put an end to feudalism, and built the Great Wall that endures today as a monument to his power.

C) In the four decades since mysterious terra-cotta statues first came to light in northern China, archaeologists have uncovered a whole lifelike army. But that wasn’t the only secret hidden underground there. Stunning revelations are now rewriting the history of the great ruler who created this army as part of his final resting place. And a radical new theory even suggests that foreign artists trained his craftsmen.

Click to show/hide answer

C, B, A

This paragraph needs to be reordered.

Over the 20-day deployment, each buoy is expected to drift as much as 10 nautical miles per day and cover 100 to 200 miles over the course of the survey.

About 20 buoys will be deployed from RPA’s ship Lotus, each with a listening device suspended 330 feet below the ocean surface to record the whales’ vocalizations.

Thanks to a newly developed system of drifting buoys, scientists from RPA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Townsville, QLD, will have a much better chance of hearing beaked whales in their deep water habitat off the West Coast.

Click to show/hide answer

Thanks to a newly developed system of drifting buoys, scientists from RPA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Townsville, QLD, will have a much better chance of hearing beaked whales in their deep water habitat off the West Coast.

About 20 buoys will be deployed from RPA’s ship Lotus, each with a listening device suspended 330 feet below the ocean surface to record the whales’ vocalizations.

Over the 20-day deployment, each buoy is expected to drift as much as 10 nautical miles per day and cover 100 to 200 miles over the course of the survey.

The text boxes have been placed in a random order. Reorder the paragraphs.

A) The quality that makes a good igloo is the same quality that makes any good apartment: location. John Kane, a community development leader, told the group that the perfect snow for building has to be hard, and without too many layers so it doesn’t crumble. A long metal rod with a small ball at the tip called a huvgut can reveal how deep and solid an area of snow is. Next, Kane drew a circle around himself with a snow knife called a pana. To contain heat, an igloo should stay small. He then cut out blocks of snow from within the circle, and the group stacked them into a spiral, smoothing over the cracks with their gloves. Once the structure surrounded them, he again took the pana and carved a small door.

B) This past spring, Shale accompanied a group of Inuit young adults into the Nunavut tundra to learn survival skills from the area’s best hunters and wisest elders, in the event they were ever stranded by broken equipment or a debilitating storm. Over nine days, they were taught first aid, firearm safety, how to clean a freshly killed caribou, and the mechanics of constructing a sturdy igloo.

C) When building an igloo for six hours in minus 54 degrees, explorer Peter Shale adhere to this ratio: For every second his hand is exposed to the cold, it takes 10 minutes back in the glove to warm it. “It’s hard to describe how cold it is,” he says of the northernmost Canadian Arctic.

Click to show/hide answer

C, B, A