PTE Highlight Correct Summary: Step-by-Step Practice

PTE Highlight Correct Summary

The PTE Highlight Correct Summary is a listening activity that involves focus. You have to listen and choose the best summary.

Essential background information:

  • You will get 2 – 3 PTE Highlight Correct Summary tasks.
  • Recordings are 30 – 90 seconds long.
  • Answer options can be up to 60 words long.
  • The mark contributes to both listening and reading scores.

You are being tested for:

  • listening comprehension
  • ability to analyse and combine information
  • ability to identify the most accurate summary 

Take a few notes, but keep your focus by listening

PTE Highlight Correct Summary

 

Just before the task begins:

  • You will see an audio status box which will count down from 10 seconds, then the status will change to ‘playing’ and the recording will begin.
  • Before the listening begins, scan your eyes down the answers – for just 3 seconds – very quickly. Just notice a few words. That will give you an idea what the text is about.
  • You can adjust your volume by moving the slider during the recording if you need to.
  • Take a breath. Be calm and focused.

 While you are listening:

  • Focus. Listen.
  • Take a few notes, but keep your focus on the listening.
  • DO NOT read the answer options while you listen. If you read, you will not be able to focus on the listening.

After listening:

  • Read the paragraphs carefully.
  • Select the best
    • Start by eliminating the impossible or unlikely answers.
    • Then survey the remaining answers.
    • Choose the best answer based on your notes and understanding.
    • Once you’ve made your decision, click ‘next.’

TIPS for PTE Highlight Correct Summary:

  1. The test moves very quickly and you need to be able to maintain your focus. This is a mental skill and you should be practising it leading up to the test. You might find it useful to put the radio or television on nearby when you are practising at home. This will help you to get used to noise and distractions and to train yourself to maintain focus.
  2. The answer options may contain some of the words from the listening. However, sometimes it is a trick! Beware. Listen, understand and use your best judgement.
  3. Remember that you need to manage your own time in the listening test. If you manage it, you will be able to finish all of the questions. So work through the answer options methodically. Read them carefully. Make your best choice – then choose ‘next.’

General Listening Practice

The best way to get good at this task is to do lots of listening practice. Yes, you are probably busy working and you have a family and you have limited time.

So you need to ask yourself, how much do you really want this? It is unlikely that you are doing the PTE purely for fun! You are doing it as a stepping stone towards another goal which might be international study, immigration, or maybe professional registration.

You know that the way to get good at something is to practise it. If you were planning to run a marathon, you wouldn’t just dream about it, you’d be at the gym working on muscle groups and you’d be hitting the pavement and running each day. You’d be pushing yourself. You’d be monitoring your performance.

The beauty of working hard to achieve your target PTE results is that it isn’t only the ticket to your next goal, it is also an excellent way to improve your language skills and your ability to communicate effectively in English. So all the hard work will pay off in the PTE result you need and in easier, more effective communication in English.

So you are probably nodding, thinking “yea, yea. I know that. But how? How can I practise?”

You can improve your PTE Highlight Correct Summary results specifically by doing test question practice and you can improve it generally by listening to:

With the TED talks listen for 30 – 90 seconds, then turn the recording off and write down the main idea. Use the transcript button below the video to read the talk after you have listened. Analyse your performance.

PTE Highlight Correct Summary

Was your summary a good one? Yes? Fantastic! Well done! What is not so good? Why? What happened? Analyse why you made a mistake. Was it a vocabulary problem? Was it speed? Pronunciation? Keep working on it.

PTE Highlight Correct Summary – Practice One

Before you start:

  • Make sure that you are ready.
  • Scan your eyes down the text for 3 seconds.
  • Focus

You will hear a recording. Choose the paragraph that best relates to the recording.

  • The speaker believes that drug and alcohol laws need to be tighter as around 25 percent of accidents are related to these two causes. This situation prevails despite religions warning us of the dangers.
  • The speaker’s purpose is to tell us that she was involved in an accident. In her case it was the fault of the driver in front who stopped on the highway for no apparent reason. He was going 65 kilometres per hour and just stopped.
  • The speaker is focusing on safety and what we need to do to reduce the death rate in people aged 16 to 19.
  • The speaker’s purpose is to tell us about the seriousness and the randomness of accidents and it is likely she is going to suggest a solution.

Click to show/hide answer

The speaker’s purpose is to tell us about the seriousness and the randomness of accidents and it is likely she is going to suggest a solution.

PTE Highlight Correct Summary

PTE Highlight Correct Summary – Practice Two

Before you start:

  • Make sure that you are ready.
  • Scan your eyes down the text for 3 seconds.
  • Focus

You will hear a recording. Choose the paragraph that best relates to the recording.

Researchers are studying screen games. Currently they are looking at how video games may be useful in helping visually impaired people to see better.

  • Although we all know that too much screen time is harmful to your eyes, it is difficult to prove this. Laboratory experiments are looking at this issue now.
  • Experiments are showing some interesting results. It seems that if you play screen games for between 5 and 15 hours per week, your eyesight can be improved.
  • There are two hallmarks of good eyesight. Firstly those with good vision can read small print more easily than others. Secondly they can distinguish between different shades of grey better than the rest of us.

Click to show/hide answer

Researchers are studying screen games. Currently they are looking at how video games may be useful in helping visually impaired people to see better.

PTE Highlight Correct Summary – Practice Three

Before you start:

  • Make sure that you are ready.
  • Scan your eyes down the text for 3 seconds.
  • Focus

You will hear a recording. Choose the paragraph that best relates to the recording.

  • Due to the Rwandan genocide normal equipment can be very expensive in some parts of Rwanda. For example the cost of shipping a bulldozer to remote regions is prohibitive.
  • An engineer named Nizeye had been working in Rwanda for many years. He was brilliant and liked to help the local people because they were very poor and had suffered during the war.
  • Nizeye incorporated the local culture into his building projects. He also provided work opportunities for locals. Thus the building process could support the whole community.
  • In Rwanda it is legally required that building projects involve mainly local workers. This helps to restore job opportunities.

Click to show/hide answer

Nizeye incorporated the local culture into his building projects. He also provided work opportunities for locals. Thus the building process could support the whole community.

Visit our website at E2Language.com to see what PTE test preparation packages we offer!

Learn how to adopt the PTE specific-format in this article: PTE Writing Tips: How To Improve Your Essay Score.

Check out the PTE Listening: Highlight Correct Summary video from our E2 PTE Academic YouTube Channel.

Find an excellent list of PTE review materials and resources from E2Language! 

Do you have any PTE Highlight Correct Summary tips you’d like to share with us? Let us know in the comments below!

Be sure to follow our social media for more PTE resources and updates!

 

Written by Melinda.

Jay vs IELTS: Round Two | Predicting my IELTS score!

It’s Jay vs IELTS: head-to-head in the ring for round two. Want to know how to get a high IELTS score? Learn all about Jay’s experience taking the IELTS exam for a second time. 

Watch this video: ‘Jay talks about taking the IELTS exam’

Jay reflects on taking the IELTS for a second time…

So, I took the IELTS again on the weekend. Why? Because I want to get straight 9s.

Hmmm, so I took the IELTS Academic about eight months ago and my IELTS score was:

  • Reading 9
  • Speaking 9
  • Listening 8.5 (must have missed a question or two) and…
  • Writing 6.5. WHAT! Yes, you heard me, 6.5.

I didn’t believe it so I sent it back to IELTS for a rescore. I then received a 7.5. Hmmm, they increased my score by one whole band, which is quite significant. To this day, I’m convinced that this was not a true reflection of my writing abilities. I’m a native English speaker and English teacher with a masters degree in applied linguistics! I am not an IELTS 6.5 in writing, nor a 7.5; I would like to think that someone like me could at least get an 8!

So, I took the IELTS again on the weekend. Why? Because I want to get straight 9s. I want to see if that is actually possible. From speaking to thousands of IELTS candidates I have never heard of someone scoring straight 9s and it should be possible, even in writing. Right?

What I learned the second time around

Writing Task 1

Writing Task 1 this time was seriously tricky! Instead of one line graph, this time the IELTS gave us three line graphs, each with two trends. Imagine seeing three of these on the paper in front of you:

IELTS score

Imagine the look on everyone’s faces when they saw not one, not two but three of these line graphs staring back at them!

Whoa! I made sure that I looked very carefully at the graphs. I carefully constructed my piece of writing and finished in 22 minutes. Overall, I thought it was a solid piece of writing but I could have structured it a little more elegantly. I reckon I would have lost .5 for coherence and cohesion.

My guess: IELTS score 8.5

Writing Task 2

Having spent 22 minutes on Writing Task 1, I had 38 minutes left for my essay. The question prompt was relatively straightforward. (Knowing the 7 question types really paid off.) It was a ‘to what extent do you agree or disagree’ prompt that asked:

Humans have invented many different things (including the wheel). Some people think that the internet is the most important invention.

 To what extent do you agree or disagree?

Okay, not bad. I completely disagreed with the question prompt and argued that while all inventions seem important at the time they are inevitably overtaken by the next big invention; so the internet is only temporarily important. I thought I wrote it extremely well. (Hopefully it was not too nuanced!)

The big take home message from this task though is that writing more than 250 words is hard work. And here’s the biggest trick of them all: You MUST use a second piece of paper. You see, the IELTS give you one piece of paper to write your essay on. You can use both sides but for me this allows me to write only 170 words. In my first test I thought I had written 250 words because I had filled both pages and hence the reason I scored 7.5.

IELTS score

If your handwriting is as big as mine then you will need two answer sheets to write your 250 word essay. Unfortunately the IELTS only give you one. Is it a trick?

I wasn’t so silly this time. I counted every word of every sentence of every paragraph. In the end I wrote more than 270 words. But make no mistake: COUNT YOUR WORDS. If you do not write more than 250 words then you will lose a point or more!

My guess: IELTS score 9

Reading

When I opened the test booklet for reading I was shocked by the first passage. It was about an Island in Greece that needed a desalination plant. It was really tough reading. I felt sorry for the non-native English speakers (I think I was the only native English speaker in the crowd!) I can’t believe how difficult some of those passages are…

I got a range of different question types including both TRUE/FALSE/NOT GIVEN and YES/NO/NOT GIVEN. Overall, I thought I answered every question correctly, though, there were two questions that took me a long time to get right.

My guess: IELTS score 9

Listening

Listening might be my nemesis! I’m a native speaker and I understood EVERYTHING that was played in the audio, but coordinating the question types, writing the answers and listening to the audio was extremely tough! IELTS Listening is really a test of understanding the IELTS test questions, and less about listening; at least, that’s how I feel about it. Anyway, I missed one question right at the start in the easiest section, and perhaps one more later on.

My guess: IELTS score 8.5/9

Speaking

The first time I took the IELTS I was completely unprepared for the psychological experience of the speaking test. It was SCARY! I didn’t need a score and was only taking the test for experience but I still found the speaking test intimidating. I was completely fine for Part 1 and Part 3, but Part 2 — the two minute monologue — completely baffled me. In the one minute preparation time I remember staring at the task card thinking WHAT?!

This time I employed E2’s PPF method, which was EXCELLENT. I relaxed, thought of three stories and BANG, I spoke easily for two minutes without going round and round.

My topic was not particularly easy. It said something like:

Talk about an advertisement you recently saw. You should say:

  • What it was advertising
  • Where you saw the advertisement
  • What it looked like

 And say whether or not it was effective.

 I wrote on my piece of paper:

Bicycle

Car

Robot

Easy. Although, I must say that the minute preparation time FLIES. You barely have time to think let alone write anything down. I thought of three stories and wrote three words down and then the examiner politely said “Okay, now you can start.”

The PPF method worked beautifully: I told a past story about seeing an advertisement for a bicycle in a magazine when I was a kid. I then talked about the present, about how I have been looking at car advertisements online. Finally, I said one sentence about wanting to see advertisements for robots in the future, before the examiner stopped me.

We then had a very complex discussion about advertising and the psychological effects it has on people. The questions kept coming and I gave deep, philosophical answers being conscious of my grammar and vocabulary.

My guess: IELTS score 9

Well, now I have to wait to see what the IELTS gives me. I’m hoping for straight 9s, but you never know with the IELTS! I’ll let you know, so stay tuned 🙂

Read about Jay’s first IELTS score The Impossible IELTS: My IELTS Writing Test Disaster after initially receiving a 6.5 in the Writing test.  

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

 

 

Written by Jay. 

TOEFL Reading Tasks | Common Question Types Answered

Don’t be intimidated by the TOEFL reading tasks! They’re straight forward if you know what you’re doing. 

This article will prepare you for the most common TOEFL reading question types, including Summarizing Information and Make Inferences.

TOEFL reading
TOEFL reading requires comprehension and understanding of what is being tested of you. Build your skills around the common TOEFL reading question types.

Introduction to TOEFL reading

In the TOEFL reading section, you’ll get three to four reading passages, each with 12-14 questions.

They’re extracts from university textbooks or academic articles on a wide range of topics. These will be similar to the types of texts you’d find in college.

Although you don’t need to be familiar with the topics, the more you read during your preparation, the more you will understand.

You’ll have 20 minutes to read each passage, and answer its associated questions. Depending on how many passages you get, the reading section will last between 60-80 minutes.

TOEFL reading question types

There are 10 different question types you might encounter, each requiring a different skill. These are:

  • Summarize Information in a passage
  • Guess vocabulary from context
  • Make Inferences about what the author means
  • Identify a reference
  • Identify a fact
  • Understand rhetorical Purpose – why the writer included particular information
  • Identify a negative fact (a fact that was NOT included in the passage)
  • Insert a word or sentence into the appropriate place in a paragraph
  • Simplify information by identifying the correct paraphrase
  • Complete a table by dragging and dropping sentences

Common TOEFL reading question types

Below are some tips for how you can build specific skills for some of the most common question types. It’s very important to build up these skills.

To do so, you’ll need to read daily, especially university level books and articles covering a wide range of topics related to the arts, humanities, nature or social science.

TOEFL reading
Topical newspaper articles are an excellent way to practice your reading comprehension.
Summarizing Information

This type of question requires you to complete a summary of a reading passage by choosing three out of six sentences provided.

You’ll need to drag and drop the correct three sentences into boxes provided on the screen and identify main ideas (which belong in a summary) from details (which don’t).

To build this skill, read an article a day and write a short summary by paraphrasing important ideas from the article.

Take notice of main ideas – these are general, and details – which are specific. A summary should only include main ideas.

Guess Vocabulary from Context

For this question, a word in the passage will be highlighted. The question asks you which word from a list of four best matches the meaning of the highlighted word. Here, context will help you, and so will a wide vocabulary.

To develop your vocabulary, you need to read. Reading is the best way to see how words are used in context. You don’t have to read complicated books.

The best way is to make reading fun by reading things that interest you: Food, gardening, fashion, celebrity news, economics, science, politics, etc.

As you read, you will discover new words in context. Try to get the meaning of an unknown word by understanding the whole sentence.

Then, look up the word on dictionary.com or on thesaurus.com to see if your guess was correct. This skill will help you with the guess vocabulary from context question.

Also, try to learn a word a day.

Check the English Learner’s Dictionary word of the day for a new word each day with the definition, pronunciation, word form and example sentences.

Make Inferences

Inference is about understanding what the author is trying to say, without actually saying it.

TOEFL reading
Making an inference is liked making an educated guess: you have drawn an idea or conclusion from evidence, reasoning and experience.

You’ll be asked something like “what does the author mean by…”.

With this kind of question, you won’t find the answer directly in the text. It will be implied, so you’ll need to infer the meaning.

To do that, you need to go beyond the text which means using higher-level thinking skills.

A good way to develop this is to do riddles. There are plenty of inference riddles that you can find online that will help you practice making inferences.

Making inferences relies on what it says in the text plus your background knowledge and ability to connect information to draw conclusions.

Another way to build this skill is, as you read, ask yourself questions about the meaning behind what is written and make guesses.

Find connecting points and bring them together to draw a conclusion. Make predictions about the information provided.

Identify a Reference

This question type is all about understanding what a word or words in a sentence refers to.

For example, “I watched Star Wars yesterday. It was a great movie”. Here the word “it” refers to “Star Wars”.

Of course, this type of question will be a bit more challenging in the actual TOEFL reading. So, you need to build up your knowledge of grammar and sentence structure.

As you read different articles, highlight any reference words like it, they, they, which, whose, who, etc. Then ask yourself, what does that word refer to?

To answer that question, you’ll need to identify the subject of the previous sentence. This is an exercise you should keep in mind when doing your daily reading practice.

It will help prepare you for this very common TOEFL reading question.

Identify a Fact
TOEFL reading
Facts are snippets of concrete evidence drawn from your reading.

In the TOEFL reading, you might be asked to find a fact from the passage.

Facts are the supporting information that tell more about the main idea. Facts often tell about the who, what, where, when, why, and how of the main idea.

The fact question is based upon information which is actually stated in the passage.  You must find the part of the passage which deals with what is being asked.

The best way to build this skill is to practice reading and answering comprehension questions.

Rhetorical Purpose

This kind of question asks you why the author mentioned something. Authors say things for different purposes.

For example:

  • To persuade the reader of something
  • To describe something
  • To make a suggestion
  • To illustrate a point
  • To prove a theory

Like the inference question, the answer will not be stated in the passage. You will need to infer.

A good way to build this skill in preparation for this type of question, is to read critically. That means, as you read, ask yourself:

  • Why did the author mention that?
  • What was the purpose of including that information?  
Simplify Information

This question type asks you to pick the best paraphrase of a sentence from a passage. You’ll be given four options to choose from.

Paraphrasing is all about expressing the same idea in a simpler way. To build this skill, read an article and pick a paragraph to paraphrase.

Write a couple of sentences using your own words to capture the same idea that the paragraph expresses.  Then read your paraphrase and compare it to the original paragraph.

Keep refining your paraphrasing skills by doing this each time you read an article.

Jump onto Youtube to watch free E2Language TOEFL videos and start learning TOEFL reading methods today! 

Start planning your TOEFL preparation time by following the link to this blog post here!

Follow a list of of link to quality TOEFL learning material right here!

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Written by Jamal Abilmona

IELTS preparation | Maximising your IELTS Reading Test Score!

This article will teach you some relevant tips on how to maximise your score in the IELTS Reading Test. Be sure to practice the 3-Steps to improve your reading comprehension and make your preparation time count on test-day! 

IELTS reading test
Get ready to: “knock your opponent of the table”(aka the IELTS exam!) using the following test preparation strategies for IELTS reading.

How can I improve my IELTS reading test score?

A great way to get off to a strong start with your IELTS reading test study is to firstly do some IELTS reading practice tests to find out or ‘diagnose’ what kind of mistakes you are making, and from there where you need to improve.

You might need to focus on increasing your academic vocabulary, improving your grammar or simply your speed of reading and ability to take in the meaning quickly – so tightening up your reading comprehension skills is a great start!

Next, start to read widely from a variety of sources to build up your vocabulary on a range of academic topics and improve your overall reading skills.

IELTS reading tests contain authentic reading passages, so as well as reading IELTS reading tests, articles that can be found in good newspapers, such as:

Also, for more advanced reading material try:

Thirdly and very importantly, it’s not only what you read but how you read! If you just let the information you read ‘go in one ear and out the other,’ and brush over unknown words like they don’t matter, you probably won’t be improving your reading skills much!

If you want suggestions on generalized IELTS study tips (IELTS general and academic), follow the link to the blog here!

3-Steps for IELTS reading practise

In order to achieve a high score in the IELTS reading test, it’s really beneficial to practice your reading comprehension skills using these 3-steps:

Step 1: Skim the passage first

Have a quick look at the whole thing to find out what it’s about and then your mind will start predicting information: read the heading, then the topic or first sentence of each paragraph and quickly speed read through the whole thing.

This will help you with ‘global’ IELTS questions, such as assessing the attitude or the author of the passage or in choosing the best title or heading for the whole passage.

Step 2: Summarise each paragraph as you read

Get into the habit of looking up after each paragraph you have read and then summarise the main idea/points in the paragraph in your own words in just 1-2 sentences.

Not only will this really exercise your brain, it will greatly improve your reading speed and comprehension skills.

Step 3: Keep a record of new vocabulary

After reading an article, note down any new words you have discovered and their meaning on an Excel spread sheet or in a notebook.

Then read this sheet/list everyday whenever you can: before work, during your lunch break, after work, on the train, before bed (!) etc.

IELTS reading test
Even spending a few minutes at the train station reading a news article online, would count as practice towards your IELTS reading exam. 

To note, it’s said that it takes 6 revisits or reviews of a new word or expression in order to remember it properly.

This is at the point where it becomes part of your personal lexicon ( … a new word for you? I will be kind and tell you the meaning this time to help you start your own IELTS reading test vocabulary list!)

A lexicon is the vocabulary of a person, a language or branch of knowledge; it is a countable noun so we can use ’a’ in front of it or put it in plural form by adding ‘s.’ For example: ‘People in the IT industry need to learn a lexicon of computer terms.’

Like I have just done, it is always a good idea to put new words into a sample sentence, so that you ‘engage’ with the word and bring it to life, thus making it easier to retain in your memory.

Overall, widening your academic vocabulary in this way will certainly be helpful for both the IELTS reading test and writing test components.

Even though it might seem like a bit of a ‘hassle’ (something that’s a bit annoying to do and seems like hard work) at the time, you will thank yourself later, and also your overall confidence in your English skills will grow 10-fold!

Making use of your time on test-day

Finally, to achieve a high score in the IELTS reading test, use the full hour to check over your answers once more, even if you have already, or feel confident and that it was ‘easy’.

You may have missed an answer, or made a careless error or an accidental mistake when transferring your answers from the test to the IELTS reading test answer sheet; you might have misread the instructions so you have put 3 words instead of 2, etc.

ielts reading test
Remember: “Practice makes perfect”, so read regularly and stay up-to-date with news items. 

Surprisingly, on test-day it is always quite amazing to observe the number of IELTS test takers who finish early and decide it’s a good idea to have a little sleep or start drawing cartoons when they have finished and are waiting for the hour to be up!

I wonder if they all achieved their target IELTS reading test scores?!

Learn about the format of the IELTS reading test on this informative IELTS Reading Tips article!

Watch the E2 IELTS video below to practice in a real life IELTS Reading mock test!

Do you have any tips for tackling the IELTS reading section? Be sure to let us know what your top strategies are in the comments! 

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

 

 

Written by Danielle K.