IELTS Reading: IELTS True/False/Not Given Question Type

IELTS Reading Strategies for True/False/Not Given Questions

Whether it’s IELTS Academic or the IELTS General test, most people across the board seem to say that the most challenging question type for the IELTS reading test is the IELTS True/False/Not Given question type.

So lets look at some IELTS reading strategies to tackle this famously tricky question type and then practice applying them together to see how we can steer our exam ship into safe and calm waters!

ielts reading true / false / not given
Learn how to navigate the treacherous IELTS waters with our IELTS reading strategy!

‘Switch on’ During Your Exam

Before we begin on our potentially treacherous ‘journey’ into the world of IELTS reading questions, an important piece of general advice to mention, which is a universal IELTS reading strategy that can be used for each and every question type, is to use your brain!

Really – and I’m not trying to be being rude or condescending, but it seems that in exam conditions we can, and do unfortunately, forget to really ‘think’ or use our brain, or even worse, become unable to think or ‘switch on’ our brain and go into some panicked ‘fight or flight’ state, otherwise known as a brain freeze or shut down!  Not much fun.

So to avoid both of the above and gain access to all the wonderful skills and abilities we all have at our disposal thanks to our amazing brains, lets have a look at some techniques to tap into our full IELTS reading strategy potential and power through the test!!

IELTS Reading Strategies

Some overall IELTS reading strategy tips:

  • Utilise our rewording or paraphrasing skills to fully absorb and clearly interpret the meaning of a statement when we read the question and answer options
  • Use our analytical or critical thinking skills to ask ourselves: what is going on in this paragraph, and then learn to separate the main idea from the supporting ideas and detail.
  • Remember to use our common sense and background knowledge on a subject to make a logical deduction or guess at a meaning of an unknown word or message/idea on a topic (just because it’s a formal academic test, doesn’t mean we can’t think for ourselves and trust our own judgment!)

IELTS True/False/Not Given Reading Strategy:

So first of all we need to read the given statement carefully and then cross check it in the text or passage and to do this we can use the following steps:

Step 1.

Focus on the statement.

Step 2.

Identify the key words and interpret meaning of the statement.

Step 3.

Locate the area in the text that talks about this particular information.

Step 4.

Decide if it is saying the same thing (True), a different thing (False) or is not mentioned or referred to at all (Not Given).

So lets try this strategy with the IELTS True/False/Not Given statements below (in the following text the relevant information has been located and highlighted for you to guide you how to use this strategy):

Practice Your IELTS True/False/Not Given Question Type

Are the Following Statements True/ False or Not Given about koalas according to the text below:

  1. Koalas are vegetarian
  2. There are more koalas in the south parts of Australia
  3. Koalas may have 1-3 babies during their lifetime
  4. Koalas are mainly awake at night
  5. Koalas get drunk from gum leaves
  6. Koalas do not drink water normally

The Real Story about Koalas

Q.1 & 2. Although bear-like, koalas are not bears. They are mammals, so feed their young milk and are marsupials, which means that their babies are born immature and they develop further in the safety of a pouch. They are a tree-dwelling, herbivorous marsupial, which averages about 9kg in weight and live on gum leaves. Their fur is thick and usually ash grey with a tinge of brown in places. Koalas in the southern parts of Australia are considerably larger and have thicker fur than those in the north. This is thought to be an adaptation to keep them warm in the colder southern winters.

Q.3. Younger breeding females usually give birth to one joey each year, depending on a range of factors. The joey stays in its mother’s pouch for about 6 or 7 months, drinking only milk. After venturing out of the pouch, the joey rides on its mother’s abdomen or back, although it continues to return to her pouch for milk until it is too big to fit inside. The joey leaves its mother’s home range between 1 and 3 years old, depending on when the mother has her next joey.

Q.4 & 5. Koalas are mostly nocturnal. They sleep for part of the night and also sometimes move about in the daytime. They often sleep for up to 18-20 hours each day. There is a myth that koalas sleep a lot because they ‘get drunk’ on gum leaves. However, most of their time is spent sleeping because it requires a lot of energy to digest their toxic, fibrous, low-nutrition diet and sleeping is the best way to conserve energy.

Q.6. The koala gets its name from an ancient Aboriginal word meaning “no drink” because it receives over 90% of its hydration from the eucalyptus leaves (also known as gum leaves) it eats, and only drinks when ill or times when there is not enough moisture in the leaves i.e. during droughts, etc.

Check Your Answer to IELTS True/False/Not Given Question Types

ielts true/false/not given
Check the answers after you have re-read the questions in the above example!
  1. Koalas are vegetarian= T (herbivorous means only eats plants; eats gum leaves)
  2. There are more koalas in the south parts of Australia = NG (koalas are bigger in size in southern Australia but the number of koalas is not mentioned)
  3. Koalas may have 1-3 babies during their life-time =NG (they do not talk about how many joeys they have)
  4. Koalas are mainly awake at night = T (mostly nocturnal, which means awake at night time)
  5. Koalas get drunk from gum leaves = F (they sleep a lot, but it doesn’t state that they become drunk)
  6. Koalas do not drink water normally = T (they usually get their water from gum leaves)
So how did you go with IELTS True/False/Not Given practice?! Tell us your thoughts in the comments below!

Remember, the IELTS reading strategy to keep carefully checking to see if it is saying the same thing, something different or they do not talk about it in the text, and above all use your brain!

For more IELTS reading tips, take a sneak peak at the IELTS Preparation: Maximising Your IELTS Reading Test Score!

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

Written by Danielle, E2Language Master Tutor.  

IELTS General Tips: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing!

Let’s say you’ve passed your IELTS exam with flying colours after 3 attempts! Imagine if you could’ve passed on your first attempt … (perhaps you hadn’t seen anything on IELTS general tips before!) 

IELTS general tips
Put your study hat on and try to anticipate what your expectations are! 

Looking back is easy, but having the foresight to realize your success in the future is more difficult. Hopefully this article from E2Language will equip you with tips and knowledge for success! 

Alright! I know you want to see ALL the best IELTS general tips in one spot … So here they are!

There’s not a lot of free quality IELTS study material on the internet. So, it’s important to have a study strategy and learn some crucial tips that will guide you in the right direction.

The TOP 3 IELTS general tips you can’t miss! 

#1 Know the format

You’ll see this repeated throughout this article and that’s because it’s NO JOKE. Having a familiarity with the types of questions you’ll get on test day will save you the time of figuring out “what is being asked of you” for each task.

#2 Timed Practice 

Whether preparing for writing or speaking, reading or listening, practice with a TIMER! The time restrictions within the exam is often what trips up test takers! Adding this pressure will make you comfortable with responding to questions in a timely manner. 

#3 Strengthen your language skills

Grammar, spelling and vocabulary MATTER! Make sure you use the correct articles, and be careful you don’t record a noun as singular if it was supposed to be plural! These seemingly “little” mistakes can cost you your desired score!

IELTS General Tips for Listening

IELTS general tips
Be prepared to listen carefully to the audio recordings.
TIP #1

Read the questions before the audio starts. This will help you pick out the right information! I used this same tip in my French Language Fluency exam and it made all the difference!

TIP #2

It’s important to write down your answers in the booklet you’re given! TRUST ME! Under that kind of pressure you’ll need the notes! Be sure to transfer them onto the answer sheet correctly.

TIP #3

WRITE IN ALL CAPS. Handwriting is important! Because if the examiner marking your test can’t read your answer, it will be marked as incorrect! Don’t lose points on a question you know the answer for.

TIP #4

If you think you’ve missed an answer … stay focused! You may miss the next if you spend your time freaking out. Move on and try to answer the next question.

TIP #5

Follow directions! If they specify “write no more than one word”, don’t write more than one! It’ll be marked as incorrect! So pay attention to word count specifications!

For more suggestions check out this blog post on IELTS Listening Tips: How to Boost Your Score! 

IELTS General Tips for Reading

PTE speaking preparation

TIP #1

If you don’t already, read plenty of English books and articles in your spare time! Practice summarizing, identifying key information, and main ideas within texts.

TIP #2

Know the format! Don’t underestimate the difficulty of this section simply because you’re an avid reader and you feel like the Reading section is the last thing you need to spend time preparing for.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: IELTS success is largely centered around whether or not the test taker knows the format of the test.

TIP #3

Not only should you know the test’s format but practice answering those same type of questions! Having a strategy for each task is as important as knowing what they are.

For more on IELTS reading tips, check out the E2Language article here

IELTS General Tips for Writing

TIP #1

Have an essay structure! This is a tip I use regardless of whether I’m writing in my second language or first! Having a clear structure and flow is CRITICAL. The best way to write is by following a structure!

TIP #2

Practice! Just like summarizing articles try writing about a passage you’ve read! Use a variety of essay question types and recreate your own scenario.

Here are the 5 types of IELTS essay types:

Writing is hard for everyone and it most definitely does NOT come easily. So be patient with yourself. Practice, read it over and try to learn from the mistakes you make.

TIP #3

Don’t forget Task 1! It’s easy to get scared and focus only on practicing for Write Essay. But remember that there are other tasks in IELTS General Writing!

Use videos like this one to prepare for Task 1:

IELTS General Tips for Speaking

Tip #1

Find a TV series in English you like. Or maybe, movies are more your thing. The most important thing is you watch regularly. This is a great way to improve your pronunciation.

Tip #2

Read out loud. Grab a book or pull up an article and find a place you can comfortably read out loud. Listen to yourself.  I promise it’s worth every minute of practice! Sometimes you feel silly but I’m telling you: the better you get the more confident you’ll feel!

Tip #3

Recording yourself as you speak is another great way to evaluate where you’re at. Try answering simple questions about your hobbies, your family, where you grew up, and your favourite movies.

NOTE: Make sure your answers aren’t too short. But don’t make your responses too long it’s easy to get off topic, and it’s more important to directly answer the question.

Now, rewatch the recording. Do you have a “nervous tick”? Maybe you use a certain word or phrase too often when you’re thinking.

Others have a certain sound that they repeat which can make understanding them difficult. Sometimes it’s a “Mmmmh..” or “Urrrrmms”. These ticks are all giveaways that you’re struggling to find the right words.

REMEMBER: Confidence goes a long way. Try to cut back on any habits that make you look hesitant.

PTE Summarize Spoken Text
This guy could be listening carefully to his recordings (…or maybe he’s sleeping)
Tip #4

If you slip up, try not to let that distract you. Keep going! It’s easy to pause or stutter when, in your mind, you’ve realized you’ve made a mistake on the way you pronounced a word.

But focus on what you’re saying. Don’t try to apologize too much. If you can finish your answer and show confidence in your speaking the examiner is less likely to focus on tiny mistakes.

Tip #5

Make eye contact! This is a great way to show your confidence. Try not to end up staring down too often or spend your time looking at the table. I know it can be scary, but you’ve got this!

Tip #6

Another great way to make yourself seem very confident and comfortable speaking the English language is to use common phrases, and slangs.

You may even want to try turning “It is” to “it’s” or “He is” to “He’s”. These little changes will make your speech sound smoother and more natural.

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

Written by: Olivia   

IELTS Speaking Preparation Overview | Tips & Topics for IELTS success!

This article on IELTS speaking preparation explores the 3 parts of the IELTS speaking section and provides a list of IELTS topics along with useful tips for test day! 

The speaking section of the IELTS test is included in both the general and academic IELTS. It lasts for less than 15 minutes and includes 3 parts which will be examined in more detail:

Part 1: Interview

Part 2: Presentation

Part 3: Discussion

Interview (IELTS speaking preparation)

In part 1, the examiner will ask you some simple questions about yourself, such as:

  • What did you study?
  • What do you do for work?
  • What’s your hometown like?
  • What kind of food do you like?
  • Do you enjoy going to the movies?

As you can see from these examples, these questions are pretty easy to answer. The trick is, not to give answers that are too short.

For example, if the examiner asks you what kind of food you like, try to elaborate. Rather than just saying: “I like all kinds of food”, you can say something like: “I have eclectic taste in food. I enjoy trying foods from different countries and experiencing their flavours. I especially like Greek, Italian and Thai food”.

Presentation (IELTS speaking preparation)

In part 2, you will be given a task card that looks something like this:

ielts speaking preparation

As you can see from the example, the topic will always be related to a personal experience you have had. You will have 1 minute to note down ideas and then you will be given 2 minutes to speak continuously on the topic.

Discussion (IELTS speaking preparation)

Part 3 is a discussion.

Here, the examiner will ask you some more questions related to the topic of part 2. But these questions will be more abstract and related to your opinion rather than your experience.

For example, based on the topic above, some discussion questions could be:

  • In your opinion, are national celebrations an important part of a country’s identity?
  • Are any traditional celebrations in your country disappearing? Why do you think that is?
  • Do you think these days that celebrations in your country are over-commercialised or have lost their original meaning?

IELTS speaking topics

There are common themes in IELTS speaking topics, though the specifics of each question vary.

See a list of common themes below!

ielts speaking preparation

The examiner is looking for four things:

#1 Fluency and coherence: Your ability to speak fluently without hesitation, repetition or loss of ideas

#2 Lexical resource: The range and accuracy of your vocabulary

#3 Grammatical range and accuracy: Your ability to speak using accurate complex and simple sentences without serious grammatical errors

#4 Pronunciation: Your ability to be understood when you speak

IELTS Speaking Test Tips

Below are some useful tips for test-day preparation:

Tip #1  Develop your answers by giving examples. This means using personal experiences or knowledge to add more information to your answers and keep your speech fluid.

Tip #2  Give your opinion. This will show the examiner that you can think in English and express yourself on a variety of topics.

Tip #3  Keep your speech fluent. Try to stick to things you know so you don’t get stuck. This will also show the examiner that you can speak at length without too much hesitation.

Tip #4  Ask for clarification. This is not a listening test. If you don’t hear a question, or don’t understand it, it is totally acceptable to ask the examiner to repeat or explain the question. This means you will be able to answer it properly.

Tip #5  Although you need to be prepared, try not to repeat memorized answers. You will come across as robotic and unnatural. The examiner will also know and will change the questions.

Before test-day:

Tip #6  Practice, practice, practice! Role play at home with a friend or family member. Let them be the examiner and you practice answering questions about a variety of different topics. You can also record yourself and listen back to see where you can improve (fluency, vocabulary, etc.).

Tip #7  Read about general topics to broaden your general knowledge. This will help you generate ideas during the test and come up with examples from your own knowledge and experience.

This will have the widening your vocabulary for reading, as well as giving you knowledge that you can then use to generate ideas for your essay. So, read a blog or social media article per day, or watch at least one Ted talk or documentary daily on the topics listed above.

Learn how to Ace the IELTS with further preparation tips and strategies.  

Check out the E2 IELTS YouTube Channel, with loads of methods and strategies including this one on IELTS speaking preparation! 

For more formal test preparation, professional IELTS coaching from experts will help you apply the essay formula to different essay questions. Feedback is another important aspect of preparing for the IELTS writing task.

Learning IELTS online with E2language will provide you with effective methods, practice essays and expert feedback to feel confident and prepared to write your IELTS essay.

Get Jay’s insight into taking the IELTS Speaking Test: IELTS Success Tips: How to get an IELTS 9 in Speaking

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

 

 

Written by Jamal A. 

 

IELTS Writing Topics & Essay Structure | IELTS Writing Task 2

Passing the IELTS Writing Task can be tough! Here you’ll find some useful IELTS writing topics plus a consistent essay formula that will help structure your essay and paragraphs. 

IELTS Writing Task 2: An overview

The essay writing task is included in both the general and academic IELTS. You will have 40 minutes to write a 250-word response to an essay question. Your essay should include four paragraphs (an introduction, two body paragraphs and a conclusion).

Although there is a consistent essay formula that will help you to structure your essay and paragraphs, you need to be aware of the different types of essay questions there are. The way you use the formula will differ according to the type of question.

IELTS Essay Structure

A typical essay structure looks like this:

IELTS writing topics. preparation, essay structure
It is important to have a planned essay structure for responding to the IELTS writing topics.

You can use this to answer any essay question type, but your essay must be tailor made for the question type.

IELTS Writing Question Types

Below is a list of six of the most common essay question types:

Agree/disagree

The agree/disagree essay question gives you a topic and asks if you agree or disagree with an idea related to that topic. For example:

Less and less parents these days are smacking their children. Some people think that this is leading to a generation of misbehaved children. Do you agree or disagree with this view?

This question is related to the topic of smacking children. The idea that not smacking is actually a bad thing. The question is asking if you agree with that idea. Your essay will have to answer that question by giving your opinion and then explaining why with supporting ideas and examples.

Advantage/disadvantage

The advantage/disadvantage essay question gives you a topic, and then asks you to discuss the advantages and disadvantages. A sample advantage/disadvantage essay question looks like this:

Some graduates prefer to travel for a year between graduation and gaining full-time employment. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this.

Here you will need to present both sides of the argument (one per paragraph) with supporting ideas and examples for each.

Discuss both views

The discuss both views question gives you two views or opinions related to a topic and asks you to discuss both. For example:

Some people think it’s the government’s responsibility to tackle environmental issues. Others believe it is up to each individual to be environmentally responsible. Discuss both sides.

Here you need to spend one body paragraph on each opinion, giving explanations and examples for why people may hold each view.

Discuss both views and give your opinion

The discuss both views and give your opinion question is very similar, but instead of just asking you to discuss two views, it also asks you to state which one you agree with. For example:

Some people think it’s better to educate boys and girls in separate schools. However, others believe that boys and girls benefit more from attending the same school. Discuss both views and give your own opinion.

In response to this essay question, you’d need to discuss both opinions (one in each paragraph) and give explanations and examples to support each one. You’d also have to say which one you agree with. You can do that within the body paragraph.

Problem/solution

The problem/solution essay question presents you with an issue which you need to discuss and then provide possible solutions for. For example:

The overpopulation of urban areas has led to numerous problems. Identify one or two serious ones and suggest ways that governments can tackle these problems.

Here you would talk about the problems caused by overpopulation in the first body paragraph, and suggest some government-led solutions in the second body paragraph.

Double question

In the double question essay, you’re actually asked two questions, and you need to make sure you answer both. For example:

Today more people are travelling than ever before. Why is this the case? What are the benefits of travelling for the traveller?

Here you have two questions to answer. 1. Why are people travelling more than before. 2. What are the benefits of travelling. You should spend one paragraph on answering each question.

IELTS Writing Topics

There are common themes in IELTS writing topics, though the specifics of each question vary. Common themes include:

IELTS writing topics

The best way to be ready to write about these topics is to be familiar with them. You will need to generate ideas during the test and come up with examples from your own knowledge and experience.

This is why you should read about general topics to broaden your general knowledge. This will have the double effect of widening your vocabulary and reading skills as well as giving you knowledge that you can then use to generate ideas for your essay.

So, read a blog or social media article or watch a Ted talk and documentary per day on the IELTS writing topics listed above.

For more formal test preparation, professional IELTS coaching from experts will help you apply the essay formula to different essay questions. Feedback is another important aspect of preparing for the IELTS writing task.

Learning IELTS online with E2language will provide you with effective methods, practice essays and expert feedback to feel confident and prepared to write your IELTS essay.

Be sure to watch the E2 IELTS YouTube channel for videos on IELTS Writing Task 2: 

To boost your preparation for IELTS, register and attend the E2Language IELTS General and Academic Live Classes. And check out E2Language’s Blog to practice IELTS activities

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

 

 

Written by: Jamal 

 

IELTS Speaking Tips 101: General IELTS Test Preparation

Okay! Another tips article… and this time we will discuss IELTS Speaking Tips!

The time has come, you are about to be tested on your spoken English skills for the IELTS exam. In your head you sound great, you’re basically fluent but the moment you open your mouth, the words don’t come out, or when they do it sounds like “blah blah blah.”

What to do? One of the greatest painters of all time, Leonardo da Vinci, said the success of his works were due to the amount of preparation he put into them first.

So in other words, it’s all about the preparation!

IELTS speaking tips
Time poor and stressed? Preparation will help you achieve success on the IELTS!

What is the IELTS examiner looking for?

Fluency, this doesn’t mean you need to speak with a perfect British or American accent, but you should speak clearly and pronounce your words correctly.

IELTS Speaking Tips

Here are some important IELTS Speaking Tips to remember:

Tip #1 Pick an English speaking television series and watch it regularly to help with your articulation and pronunciation.

Tip #2 Read out loud to yourself when you can, this will help identify words you find difficult to pronounce and it will give you more confidence reading in English.

Tip #3 Practice using a range of functional vocabulary such as opinion language to express yourself. For example, ‘I agree with the opinion of …’

Tip #4 Pick out the topics you might talk about (everyday ideas) and practice them in a conversation with someone you know, or record yourself and listen back to see how you sound, and what improvements are needed.

Tip #5 Prepare a list of Linking Words and practice using them before the test, for example: ‘As a matter of fact’ or ‘generally speaking’.

Tip #6 Give examples, this allows you to talk about something you know and gives you the opportunity to add detail to the discussion.

Tip #7 Correct your mistakes with the examiner. If you notice that you made a mistake, correct it straight away (e.g. “I was getting for the train, I mean getting on the train…”).

Read on for in-depth IELTS Speaking tips on pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary. 

IELTS Speaking Tips: Pronunciation

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog, Peter Piper picked a pickled pepper! These are some of the sentences Australian kids practice in the classroom to help them with articulation and pronunciation.

Pronunciation is sometimes a tricky thing to practice, especially if you don’t have access to conversing with an English speaker. But where there’s a will there’s a way. How? Pick an English speaking series and watch it regularly.

When I was learning German I ended up with a southern accent because the soap opera I used to watch was set in southern Germany. It’s a great way to learn how to pronounce words, listen to the experts.

Now, I suggest you don’t pick a Scottish series, as even the best of us struggle to understand those guys!

Read out loud. Read out loud to yourself when you can, this will help identify words you find difficult to pronounce and it will give you more confidence reading in English.

Sometimes getting stuck on the way you pronounce a word can really affect your confidence, the best way to avoid this is, PRACTICE of course.

But if you do stumble on a word, don’t let it put you off and keep going. If you show confidence in your speaking the examiner will not focus so much on little slip ups.

IELTS speaking tips
Show your confidence and don’t forget to smile! The IELTS examiner is human too!

IELTS Speaking Tips: Grammar and vocabulary

Grammar and vocabulary are also important and count for around 25% of your speaking score.

In the IELTS test, you will be giving your opinion a lot, talking about your likes and dislikes. The IELTS examiner basically wants to know if you can use a range of functional vocabulary such as opinion language to express yourself. For example:

As far as I know …

I agree with the opinion of …

I could be wrong, but …

I’d definitely say that …

I’d guess/imagine that …

I’d say that …

I’m absolutely certain that …

If you want to brush up on your grammar, E2language.com have a wide range of grammar exercises and I highly recommend using them to brush up on your grammar as well as following these IELTS speaking tips.

 IELTS Speaking Tips: IELTS speaking topics

Pick out the topics you might talk about (everyday ideas) and practice them in a conversation with someone you know, or record yourself and listen back to see how you sound, and what improvements are needed. Remember it’s not an academic discussion (UNLESS you are doing the academic IELTS test), they really don’t need to hear you express your opinion about the latest research in Quantum Physics, it’s about you being able to communicate in English with confidence. Use Natural English short forms like “it’s” and not “it is”, and commonly spoken phrases like “I guess” and “I suppose”. Prepare a list of Linking Words and practice using them before the test, for example:

Adding more information:

  • And
  • Also
  • As well as
  • Another reason is

Make sure it’s not too short and sweet.

For example:

Question:” Where did you grow up”

Answer: “In my parents’ house”

Better would be:

Answer: “I grew up in Finland, and I had a lovely childhood. I lived in an old cottage just outside Finnagoo Forest, with both my parents, two brothers and a dog called Pablo.”

Remember, however, that very long answers are not always good answers. It’s rather easy to go off topic and lose coherence. It is ok to give short answers sometimes too.

If you happen to get a question you don’t know very much about, just give a short answer by saying you don’t know a lot about that topic and then wait for the next question.

A great way to give yourself time to think about the question is to repeat/reformulate the question.

For instance in In parts 1 and 3 you are not given any thinking time: you are supposed to start speaking immediately, so a way to give yourself a bit more time is to just repeat the question. “What did I enjoy about my last holiday? Let me see…”

Another great tip is to give examples, this allows you to talk about something you know and gives you the opportunity to add detail to the discussion.

IELTS Speaking Tips: Some extra little tips and hints!

  • Be sure to correct your mistakes, if you notice you made a mistake correct it straight away (i.e. “I was getting for the train, I mean getting on the train…”)
  • If you don’t understand the question to be sure to ask the Examiner to explain further.
  • Make eye contact, make sure you don’t end up having a conversation with the table, acknowledge the Examiner and look at them during the conversation.
  • Speak ONLY English immediately before the exam. Try to talk to someone or talk to yourself (ideally in your head) “man this is nerve-racking, I can’t wait to go for a victory coffee afterward.”
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Practice English with a friend before your IELTS Speaking evaluation, and remember to include them in your ‘victory coffee’ afterwards!

If you are really serious about getting the best possible result for your IELTS test, I would highly recommend signing up to e2language.com. You will have access to one on one IELTS coaching.

Our IELTS teachers are very qualified and passionate about getting you the score you need. You will also have access to a wide range of test questions, grammar exercises, IELTS secrets to success, webinars and much more.

For some more secrets to success check out this link to the E2 IELTS channel.

Remember that the right preparation can get you the right results! Tally your familiarity of IELTS Speaking by getting the most out of Jay’s experiences in his article: IELTS Speaking: How to get an IELTS 9.

Have you taken IELTS? How did you prepare for the IELTS Speaking Section?

Follow our social media for more IELTS resources and updates!

Written by: Michelle Anderson